Easter 1: Getting to an Easter moment

Photo by Jan Tinneberg on Unsplash
Photo by Jan Tinneberg on Unsplash

Second-hand stores report that donations of clothing and household goods are way up possibly because people are Kondo-izing – emptying their homes of the things which no longer “spark joy.” It remains to be seen whether this year’s Kondo-izer’s will be back with another load of clutter next year. Did getting rid of the unnecessary things enable them to live differently or was it simply a way of making room so they could collect more stuff?  A similar question faces us at the end of Lent: will we start Lent next year with the same old clutter?

Some people are very good at Lent. For them, it is a 40 day marathon of privation and an exercise in self-control. Once the 40 days are over, they take back the stuff they gave up. It’s a good exercise, but it does not get us to an Easter moment. We get to an Easter moment only if a Lenten discipline has helped us to see that something was taking up a lot of space in our lives which was just clutter and we become willing to let it go and leave it behind.  If we can close the door on that clutter, another door will open.

Lent helps us see what is clutter; then we need to let it go and leave it behind.

Easter Sunday will come on April 21 this year. It’s a great celebration but it is not the same thing as an Easter moment. Easter moments will arrive when we least expect them, maybe as glimmers of an insight or as an “aha” as loud as a trumpet fanfare. They will arrive when and how they will. We may barely feel ready, but ready we will be, because we kept a Lent. We got rid of the clutter: we left it behind and closed the door on it. Without a doubt, another door will open.

Happy Easter.

Lent 1C: Perfect Answers

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Deuteronomy 26:1-11, Romans 10:8b-13, Luke 4:1-13

I found myself thinking about the TV gameshow “Jeopardy” this week, after hearing that Alex Trebeck has stage IV pancreatic cancer. That is a tough diagnosis to receive. He has a difficult journey ahead of him.

I started watching Jeopardy with my grandmother and when the host of the show was Art Fleming. I had favorite categories, like “Explorers,” because I was in 5th grade and we were reading about the explorers so I knew who they were.  I did ok with the Bible category, but my grandmother usually did better.

Whatever the category, it always felt good to get the right answers.  On Jeopardy, there was only one right answer and they always showed what the right answer was.

The devil in today’s gospel does not say what he thinks of Jesus’ answers.  We always presume that if Jesus said it, it must be the right and most perfect answer. But one can imagine different answers, and in the story there is no ringing bell or flashing light or voice from the heavens saying “yes, that’s right!”  Instead, after each of Jesus’ responses, the devil just moves on to another temptation, until he gives up.

It’s possible that what is important about Jesus’ answers is not that they are “correct” in the Jeopardy sense that they are the “the one and only” correct answers. It’s possible that they are “right” because they were the right answers for him. They were the answers that focused him on what mattered to him, on what he valued, on the things he believed because he knew them to be true from his own experience. They were right for him because they were what he needed to resist his temptations.

Something else might work for us. Maybe something from a Bible category; maybe not.  Whatever our answers are, they need to be about what matters to us, what we value, what we believe because we know it to be true in our own experience.

Creeds are about beliefs in a way. The Nicene Creed is a centuries-old, well-beloved summary of key Christian concepts. But that is not the kind of belief that we need when we are in the wilderness.  Knowing whether the Spirit proceeds from the Father or from the Father and the Son will not work to keep me in touch with my better self when I am hearing my devil and facing my temptations. When that happens, I need, we need the answers that are about what matters to us, what we value and what we believe because we know it to be true in our own experience.

Maybe something from the second reading, something pithier like, “Jesus is Lord.”  Or something from the first reading, a story that talks about where we came from and how we got here and where we think we’re going: “My ancestor was a wandering Aramean…”  Maybe a line from the psalms or a verse from a hymn or something someone we loved or admired always used to say. Whatever it is, what will make it the right answer for us is that it will be about what matters to us, what we value, and what we believe because we have lived the truth of it.

The journey of Lent is just beginning. Along the way there will be wilderness and in that wilderness, there will be temptations which can’t be avoided. They will require a response from us. We need to know what it is we value, what matters to us, what we believe because we know because we have lived it.  If our response comes from that, it will absolutely be the perfect answer.